5 Beautiful Horse Breeds Known For Their Spotted Coats


Most people think that the only horse breed that comes spotted is the American Appaloosa, but this isn’t the case! Did you know that aside from the Appaloosa, there are several other spotted horse breeds out there? You may have heard of the Appaloosa, but have you heard of any of these other breeds?

5 Horse Breeds Known For Their Spotted Coats:

1. The Appaloosa

HeightBetween 14.2 to 16 hands high
Weight1,000 pounds (455 Kilograms)
Acceptable Coat ColorsAny coat color including dilutes and roans; generally seen with spots
Country of OriginUnited States of America
TypeWarmblood

The Appaloosa horse breed is a breed of horse known for its spotted coat and fiery temperament. These horses were especially bred by the Nez Perce Native Americans for use as war horses, riding horses, and hunting horses.

The Appaloosa is a breed, like many others found in America, that was descended from Spanish horses when the “New World” was discovered. The ancestors of the Appaloosa breed were used by travelers and Conquistadors when exploring the “New World.”

It is thought that the Spanish horses that escaped, were stolen, or abandoned were taken by the Native Americans in the area. It was these horses that were the base stock for the Appaloosa breed.

These horses can come in a variety of coat patterns and colors. The base coat colors that these horses can be include:

With these coat colors just being the base colors for all the spots going on top of these horses, you can just imagine the great variety of coat patterns and colors that are seen in this breed.

The different spot patterns seen in Appaloosa horses include:

  • Blanket
  • Spots
  • Blanket with Spots
  • Roan Blanket
  • Roan Blanket with Spots
  • Snowflake
  • Leopard
  • Frost

These beautiful horses can be seen in so many colors! It is amazing that one breed of horse can be seen in so many different colors and patterns!

The Appaloosa may be the only breed in this list that can still be considered purebred even if the horse lacks spots.

2. The Knabstrupper

HeightBetween 15.2 and 16 hands high
WeightAround 1,100 pounds (500 Kilograms)
Acceptable Coat ColorsAny coat color including dilutes and roans; must be seen with spots
Country of OriginDenmark
TypeWarmblood

The Knabstrupper breed is a horse that originated in the European country of Denmark. This breed is a newer breed compared to the Appaloosa as it wasn’t classified as an official breed until the 1800s.

The founding sire of this breed was descended from an Iberian mare from the Knabstrup Estate in Denmark and a Palomino Frederiksborg stallion. The resulting stallion was born with a gorgeous coat adorned with spots and colors. Because his coat patterns were so desired, he became an extremely popular stallion.

Because breeders of the Knabstrup horses were only focused on coat colors, the conformation and quality of these horses soon deteriorated and the popularity of the breed fell drastically. The breed nearly disappeared until recent intervention and attempts to restore the breed took place.

Today, the Knabstrup is a popular riding horse and is frequently used in competitions and even in circuses.

These horses can come in a variety of coat patterns and colors as do other spotted breeds. The base coat colors that these horses can be are the same as that of the Appaloosa. These colors include:

The spot patterns allowed in this breed include:

  • Spots
  • Blanket with Spots
  • Roan Blanket
  • Roan Blanket with Spots
  • Snowflake
  • Leopard
  • Frost
  • These coat colors and patterns combine to create the appearance of the Knabstrupper horse that we know today.

    3. The Pony of the Americas

    HeightBetween 11.2 and 14.2 hands high
    WeightBetween 800 and 1,000 pounds (365 to 455 Kilograms)
    Acceptable Coat ColorsMust have a spotted coat
    Country of Origin United States of America
    TypePony

    The Pony of the Americas is a breed of pony whose origins land in the United States of America. This spotted pony is not just known for its great temperament, but it is also known for its versatility and success as a children’s riding pony.

    This breed is extremely new as far as horse breeds come. This breed of pony was only just classified as a breed in the 1950s.

    The original cross between two horses to create this breed was done by an Appaloosa mare and a Shetland pony stallion. Together, this cross created a stallion by the name of Black Hand 1 who became the founding sire of this breed.

    As time went on breeds such as the Quarter Horse, Arabian, and Welsh Pony were added, along with more Appaloosa and Shetland blood.

    Today, a purebred Pony of the Americas must carry one of the Appaloosa coat patterns in order to be considered a true purebred.

    Because of the Appaloosa blood in the genetics of these ponies, they must carry one of the base colors and a spot pattern. The base coat colors these ponies can be include:

    Paired with one of these base coat colors must be one of the several coat patterns seen in the Appaloosa breed. These are:

    • Blanket
    • Spots
    • Blanket with Spots
    • Roan Blanket
    • Roan Blanket with Spots
    • Snowflake
    • Leopard
    • Frost

    These popular little ponies sure are show-stoppers because of their beautiful and unique coats.

    4. The Colorado Ranger

    HeightBetween 14.2 and 16 hands high
    Weight1,000 pounds (455 Kilograms)
    Acceptable Coat ColorsAny coat color including dilutes and roans; generally seen with spots
    Country of OriginUnited States of America
    TypeWarmblood

    The Colorado Ranger is a breed of horse that is very similar to that of the Appaloosa. In fact, they are so closely related that 1 in 8 Appaloosa horses has Colorado Ranger ancestors!

    Did you know that 90% of all registered Colorado Rangers are also registered with the Appaloosa Horse Club? This is how closely related these horses are!

    Because they are from such similar ancestry, there are very few differences between the two horses.

    Like the Appaloosa, the Colorado Ranger is a breed that is able to be solid colored, though this is rarely seen.

    The base coat colors of these horses include:

    The spot patterns allowed in this breed include:

    • Blanket
    • Spots
    • Blanket with Spots
    • Roan Blanket
    • Roan Blanket with Spots
    • Snowflake
    • Leopard
    • Frost

    This beautiful breed at one point was my favorite type of horse just because of its great looks!

    5. The British Spotted Pony

    HeightBetween 8 and 14.2 hands high
    Weight550 pounds (250 Kilograms)
    Acceptable Coat ColorsAny coat color including dilutes and roans; must be seen with spots
    Country of OriginBritain
    TypePony

    The British Spotted Pony is a breed of pony that originated in Britain, or more specifically, England. The origins of these ponies date back to the days where horses with spots were greatly prized among the public. Kings and Queens would use these spotted horses and ponies to draw their carriages or give them to their friends in neighboring kingdoms.

    In the year 1947, a spotted horse and pony society was formed in Britain which thus became the registry and association for these ponies.

    Soon these ponies began to breed to create a more specified type and the British Spotted Pony was born. With the great popularity of these ponies, many began to be exported due to the high demand. The exporting was later stopped in the 1970s because many of the great stallions and mares were lost overseas.

    Today there are about 800 of these ponies registered though it is though that there are many more unregistered ponies of this breed.

    These ponies can be seen with many different base colors. These include:

    These ponies must be spotted to be considered a true purebred. The spot patterns these ponies can be seen in include:

    • Blanket
    • Spots
    • Blanket with Spots
    • Roan Blanket
    • Roan Blanket with Spots
    • Snowflake
    • Leopard
    • Frost

    Hailey Johnson

    Horses have been my passion ever since I can remember. At school, I was known as that weird horse girl, and I would read horse encyclopedias for fun. Over the years since those days, I have only learned more. My experiences with horses of a variety of breeds have taught me a lot. Now I want to share what I know with you!

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